As of July 6th, APS offices are open to staff and invited visitors. The Society will remain closed to the public for at least the rest of the summer. Library & Museum staff now have access to our collections and will respond to reference and photoduplication requests as soon as possible. However, please note that response times may be delayed due to increased demand. The Society will continue a robust slate of virtual programs throughout the summer and fall. Read more about virtual programming and resources that can be accessed remotely. For further information on the APS reopening and its COVID response, please click here.

Career Chats - Executive Officer

Chat will be pre-recorded on Tuesday (6/2) and posted here at a later date.

Have questions about this program? Email MuseumEducation@amphilsoc.org

"Career Chats with the American Philosophical Society" surrounded by old and current photos of staff

What does it take to work for America’s oldest learned society? Hear from staff at the American Philosophical Society (APS) as we learn just that! This series brings you real conversations with APS staff on their careers and how they came to work at the Society. 

Learn about archivists, conservators, and more as we explore the many careers and people of the APS. All Career Chats will be pre-recorded and uploaded on Thursday mornings. We’d love to hear if you have any questions about these careers! Submit those here.

About this week’s Staff Member/Career

Robert Hauser 

 

Robert M. Hauser is the Executive Officer of the American Philosophical Society. From 2010 to 2017, he served as Executive Director of the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He is the Vilas Research Professor and Samuel Stouffer Professor of Sociology, Emeritus, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has been an investigator on the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS) since 1969 and led the study from 1980 to 2010. The WLS, which began as a study of post-secondary education, has followed the lives of more than 10,000 Wisconsin High School graduates of 1957 for 60 years and has become a national resource for bio-social research on health and retirement. While at the UW-Madison, he directed the Center for Demography of Health and Aging, the Institute for Research on Poverty, and the Center for Demography and Ecology. Hauser’s research interests include statistical methodology, trends in social mobility and in educational progression and achievement, the uses of educational assessment as a policy tool, and changes in socioeconomic standing, cognition, health, and well-being across the life course.

Learn more about Bob's favorite APS object, the Jefferson polygraph, here

The next Chat will be in the fall. The series is taking a break over the summer!

Learn more about Career Chats with the American Philosophical Society.