Events

The Worlds the Shawnees Made: Migration and Violence in Early America

Presenter: Stephen Warren
Date: Thursday, April 3, 2014 - 5:30pm to 8:00pm
Type of Event: Lecture, Reception, and Book Signing


In 1779, Shawnees from Chillicothe, a community in the Ohio country, told the British, "We have always been the frontier." Their statement challenges an oft-held belief that American Indians derive their unique identities from longstanding ties to native lands. By tracking Shawnee people and migrations from 1400 to 1754, Stephen Warren illustrates how Shawnees made a life for themselves at the crossroads of empires and competing tribes, embracing mobility and often moving willingly toward violent borderlands. By the middle of the eighteenth century, the Shawnees ranged over the eastern half of North America and used their knowledge to foster notions of pan-Indian identity that shaped relations between Native Americans and settlers in the revolutionary era and beyond.

Warren's deft analysis makes clear that Shawnees were not anomalous among Native peoples east of the Mississippi. Through migration, they and their neighbors adapted to disease, warfare, and dislocation by interacting with colonizers as slavers, mercenaries, guides, and traders. These adaptations enabled them to preserve their cultural identities and resist coalescence without forsaking their linguistic and religious traditions.

Stephen Warren is associate professor of history at Augustana College and was a historian for the PBS documentary "We Shall Remain," which aired in 2009.

Warren also received a Mellon Foundation Sabbatical Fellowship from the American Philosophical Society in 2010-11 for this important and much-needed book on the early history of the Shawnees and mid-America.


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The Society for Useful Knowledge: How Benjamin Franklin and Friends Brought the Enlightenment to America

The Society for Useful Knowledge: How Benjamin Franklin and Friends Brought the Enlightenment to America
Presenter: Jonathan Lyons
Date: Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 5:30pm
Type of Event: Lecture, Reception, and Book Signing


Jonathan Lyons is an independent scholar and author, focusing on problems of intellectual history, epistemology, and the sociology of knowledge. He has a PhD in sociology from Monash University, in Melbourne, Australia, and a BA with honors in Russian and History from Wesleyan University. He lives in Portland, Oregon.

With the “first Drudgery” of settling the American colonies now well and truly past, Benjamin Franklin announced in 1743, it was high time that the colonists set about improving the lot of humankind through collaborative inquiry. From Franklin’s idea emerged the American Philosophical Society, an association hosted in Philadelphia and dedicated to the harnessing of man’s intellectual and creative powers for the common good. The animus behind the Society was and is a disarmingly simple one ─ that the value of knowledge is directly proportional to its utility. This straightforward idea has left a profound mark on American society and culture and on the very idea of America itself ─ and through America, on the world as a whole.


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Advising Woodrow Wilson

Advising Woodrow Wilson
Presenter: J. P. Leavell
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2014 - 5:30pm to 7:30pm
Type of Event: Lecture and Reception


Perry Leavell is the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of History Emeritus at Drew University. He received his BA from Emory University, MA from Duke University, and PhD “with distinction” from Tulane University. He taught history at Drew University from 1967 to 2008, where he chaired the history department, won the Presidential Distinguished Teaching Award, and taught popular courses on the History of the American Presidency and the History of Business in America. He has published articles on American politics and biographies of presidents for young people. Currently, he lectures widely on historical topics in northern and central New Jersey, and he is working on a book about Woodrow Wilson’s major adviser Edward M. House.


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The NeoLucida Project: A Conversation with Pablo Garcia

Date: Thursday, November 7, 2013 - 5:30pm to 8:30pm
Type of Event: APS Museum Event



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On Paper: The Everything of Its Two-Thousand-Year History

On Paper: The Everything of Its Two-Thousand-Year History
Presenter: NICHOLAS BASBANES
Date: Wednesday, October 30, 2013 - 5:30pm to 7:30pm
Type of Event: Lecture, Reception, and Book Signing


Nicholas Andrew Basbanes has written a thoroughgoing chronicle about the stuff books are traditionally made of: paper. He starts with its invention in China 1800 years ago, considers its use for everything from currency to the blueprints that facilitated the Industrial Revolution, and records a visit to the National Security Agency, where 100 million secret documents have been pulped and recycled as pizza boxes.

Basbanes graduated from Bates College and received a master of arts degree from Pennsylvania State University. He received his master’s degree in journalism in 1969 while serving aboard the aircraft carrier USS Oriskany during the first of two combat deployments he made to Yankee Station in the Gulf of Tonkin, off the coast of Vietnam. His first book, A Gentle Madness: Bibliophiles, Bibliomanes, and the Eternal Passion for Books, was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in non-fiction for 1995, and was named a New York Times notable book of the year. He was commissioned by Yale University Press to write a centennial history of the Press, A World of Letters.

In addition to his books, Basbanes has written for numerous newspapers, magazines, and journals. He writes the “Gently Mad” column for Fine Books & Collections magazine, and lectures widely on book-related subjects. Book lovers relish meeting people who share their passion, just as all aficionados gravitate toward their own kind. So when Nicholas Basbanes, the king of bibliophiles, speaks here...there's sure to be a like-minded crowd on hand to absorb his every word.

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Secret Cinema – Lured by Lenses

Date: Wednesday, October 16, 2013 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Type of Event: APS Museum Event



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Jefferson’s Shadow: The Story of His Science

Jefferson’s Shadow: The Story of His Science
Presenter: KEITH THOMSON
Date: Thursday, October 10, 2013 - 5:30pm to 7:30pm
Type of Event: Lecture, Reception, and Book Signing


Keith Thomson is executive officer at the American Philosophical Society and professor emeritus of natural history at the University of Oxford. He was for five years a visiting fellow of the International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello, VA. Thomson is the author of nine books, most recently The Legacy of the Mastodon and The Young Charles Darwin.

In the voluminous literature on Thomas Jefferson as statesman, leader of men, country farmer, inventor, lawyer, architect, and philosopher, little has been written about his passionate interest in science. This new and original study of Jefferson presents him as a consummate intellectual whose view of science was central to both his public and his private life. Keith Thomson reintroduces us in this remarkable book to Jefferson’s world and reveals the extent to which Jefferson used science, thought about it, and contributed to it, becoming in his time a leading American scientific intellectual.

With a storyteller’s gift, Thomson shows us a new side of Jefferson. He answers an intriguing series of questions—How was Jefferson’s view of the sciences reflected in his political philosophy and his vision of America’s future? How did science interact with his religion? Did he make any original contributions to scientific knowledge? — and illuminates the particulars of Jefferson’s scientific endeavors. Thomson discusses Jefferson’s theories that have withstood the test of time, his interest in the practical applications of science to societal problems, his leadership in the use of scientific methods in agriculture, and his contributions toward launching at least four sciences in America: geography, paleontology, climatology, and scientific archaeology. A set of delightful illustrations, including some of Jefferson’s own sketches and inventions, completes this impressively researched book.

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Drawing En Plein Air with Varley’s “Fantastical Patent Graphic Telescope Machine”

Date: Saturday, September 14, 2013 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm
Type of Event: APS Museum Event



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Second Saturday: An original performance through the art of Paper Theater

Date: Saturday, September 14, 2013 - 12:00pm to 3:00pm
Type of Event: APS Museum Event



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Secret Cinema - The Beauty in Nature

Date: Wednesday, July 24, 2013 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Type of Event: APS Museum Event



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